Perfect Easy-to-Peel Hard Boiled Eggs [The Trick!]

The perfect easy-to-peel poached egg, Elizabeth Ryder's Blog

I was on a mission to find The best way to make easy-to-peel hard-boiled eggsAnd after a lot of trial and error, I finally discovered the secret to making shells drop instantly.

Let me be the first to tell you… We’ve all gone astray about how to boil eggs.

Who else was told to put the eggs in a saucepan, cover them with an inch of cold water, and then let them boil? Yes. Me too. But this is where we’ve been doing it wrong.

Follow this process on how to hard boil eggs (you can also read or print them in the recipe card below) and I guarantee you’ll have the easiest hard-boiled egg you’ve ever made.

#1: An easy-to-peel hard-boiled egg is the result of a hot boil start.

no kidding. I think the myth of “cold start” eggs came from the fact that potatoes are actually Act Need a cold start. When you give the potatoes a cold start – meaning you put the chopped potatoes in a saucepan, and cover an inch with cold water, and then Boil — you end up with better texture and more even cooking. (Ditch that next time you make mashed potatoes!)

Since this method of cooking is tried and true for potatoes, people have assumed the same thing with eggs. But that is not the issue!

#2: Making easy-to-peel hard boiled eggs requires a shock in cold water.

After 13 minutes on low heat (not boiling – see full method below and read tips to prevent cracking), immediately place eggs in ice water. Shocking them in ice water stops the cooking process.

Not only does this result in a fluffier white and a perfectly cooked yolk (no weird dark streaks here), the eggs cool instantly making it easier to peel.

My friends on one of my favorite blogs, serious eats, Turn to his knowledge, but you can only trust me that it’s true.

You don’t even have to use another pot, see how I ram them directly into the pan with ice water in the video tutorial on this page.

#3: Easy-to-peel hard-boiled eggs require a specific cooking time.

You don’t want to boil the eggs for the full 13 minutes, or they will be overcooked. The best way is to bring the water to a full boil, then lower the eggs carefully (a fine mesh strainer or spider skimmer works well), then let it boil for 30 seconds.

After 30 seconds, turn on the stove over low heat and let it simmer very gently. Trust me, this is necessary.

None of these tips require much effort—and trust me—they’re worth it for the shells practically falling out of the eggs.

Boiling starts for 30 seconds to boil very slowly for 13 minutes, then an ice bath at the end makes perfect hard-boiled eggs and easy to peel.

But, there are still some bugs that will spoil easy-to-peel hard-boiled eggs.

How about making a small hole in the top of the egg?

In my experience, making that little hole in the shell with a thumb gun actually helps – but only a little. If you don’t have a thumbtack on hand, you don’t need to drive to the store to get one just to make easy-to-peel eggs.

However, if you already have one, use a rolling pin to make a small hole in the top of the large end of the egg before boiling (press gently and it will go straight through the shell). Peeling off the peel will be much easier.

Other methods require the presence of salt or vinegar in the water. I’ve tried both (several times!) and haven’t found that either trick made a difference. Therefore, reserve salt and vinegar for other recipes.

After boiling, leave the eggs in the ice bath for at least 15 minutes, Then peel or refrigerate (unpeeled) for up to seven days. To peel, gently press the egg into the large end first, then the small end, then all around.

Best not to grasp because it is easy to break the white color. Just lightly press everywhere to break the peel all over and it will peel off easily.

Do you want to learn how to make deviled eggs? You can do it here with my own devil eggs tutorial.

Easy to peel eggs

Tips to prevent cracking

Post update: Since this blog post was published last year, it has quickly become one of the top Google search results. And while the vast majority of you have commented that this method works perfectly, a few of you below have commented that your eggs are cracking.

This could be for two reasons:

Mistake #1: The pan is crowded.

Make sure the pan is not crowded. Your eggs need a little room to groove. They should not touch or be on top of each other. There should be enough space to allow a single layer of eggs into the pan while cooking.

If they crack while cooking, it could be because they are too crowded.

Mistake #2: Super fresh eggs crack more easily.

Finally, don’t use eggs that are too fresh for hard-boiled eggs.

This is perhaps the only time in the kitchen that a fresh day isn’t the best. Shells like to stick to eggs that have just been laid. If you have your own chicken or buy it directly from a farmer, use these eggs for a great scramble or hard-boil.

If you bought your eggs at the grocery store, they will already be a few weeks old, so they will work great. In the United States, eggs are refrigerated because they are power-washed before being packaged.

no need to bring them to room temperature; You can use this method with eggs taken straight from the refrigerator.

How to use boiled eggs

printing press

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Describe

This easy-to-peel hard-boiled egg post is the first Google search result for a reason – it works! Read the recipe notes below to prevent eggs from cracking. If you like this recipe, give it a 5 star rating in the comments below to help other readers.

One reader recently commented, “I only used your method yesterday and the results were amazing! Not only did the shells ‘slide’ away – the eggs were amazing.”


  • Eggs (obviously!)
    (Extremely overripe eggs break easily, so try to use “older” but not bad eggs. Read notes below.)


  1. Bring a pot of water to a full boil. Use an appropriately sized pot that will fit your eggs. I am using a 2.5 liter pot for six eggs.
  2. If using, use a printing gun to make a small hole in the top of the large end of the eggs. (See note).
  3. Gently lower the eggs into the boiling water. A fine mesh strainer or spider skimmer works well for this.
    • (Tip from a comment from a reader: “I took the boiling water off the stove and let it settle for a moment and then gently lowered my eggs. It worked great! I had several broken eggs in the first batch when I put the eggs in the water they were just boiling. This helps someone because this recipe is a game changer!”)
  4. Bring to a boil over high heat for 30 seconds, then turn the burner to lowest for a very light (not rolling) boil. Cover the pan with a lid and wait 13 minutes. (It’s okay if the water doesn’t come back to a boil for 30 seconds.)
  5. Put the eggs in an ice bath. You can do this by filling a separate bowl with water and ice, transferring the eggs, or gently pouring the water from the pan without breaking the eggs, then filling the pan with cold water and ice. The first method, using the pot, is the easiest to prevent accidentally cracking the eggs while they’re heating.
  6. Leave the eggs in the ice bath for 15 minutes.
  7. Peel or store in the refrigerator unpeeled for up to three days.
  8. To peel, gently tap the egg at the large end first, then the small end, then tap all around to gently break the shell. Be amazed at how easy it is to peel them.


Notes

Tips to prevent cracking:

  • Crack Prevention Tip #1: Make sure the pan isn’t crowded. Your eggs need a little room to groove. They should not touch or be on top of each other. There should be enough space to allow a single layer of eggs into the pan while cooking. If they crack while cooking, it could be because they are too crowded.
  • Cracking Prevention Tip #2: Don’t use eggs that are too fresh for hard-boiled eggs. This is perhaps the only time in the kitchen that a fresh day isn’t the best. Shells like to stick to eggs that have just been laid. If you have your own chicken or buy it directly from a farmer, use these eggs for a great scramble or hard-boil. If you bought your eggs at the grocery store, they will already be a few weeks old, so they will work great. In the United States, eggs are refrigerated because they are power-washed before being packaged. No need to bring them to room temperature, you can use this method with the eggs taken straight out of the refrigerator.
  • Make sure there is only one layer of eggs in the pan. If you try to stack the eggs or stuff more into the appropriate pan, the water will not be hot enough to cook the eggs. I’m using a 2.5 liter pot for six eggs, about 6.5 inches in diameter.

– In my experience, making that little hole in the shell with a thumbtack actually helps – a bit. If you don’t have a thumbtack on hand, you don’t need to drive to the store to get one just to make easy-to-peel eggs. But, if you have one, use a printing gun to make a small bunch at the top of the large end of the egg before boiling (press lightly and it will go right through the shell). Peeling off the peel will be much easier.

Unpeeled eggs can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 7 days. I suggest storing in an airtight container to prevent odor in the refrigerator.

Key words: Hard boiled eggs, easy to peel eggs, the best boiled eggs

Looking to use beautifully peeled eggs? Secretly try healthy devil eggs

Click here to read a secret healthy deviled egg recipe

healthy deviled eggs elizabeth ryder

What is your opinion? Have you tried this method or another? Tell us how it turns out in the comments below.


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